Disclosure & Policy

WEBSITE DISCLOSURE

Calibre Mining Corp. (“Calibre” or “the Company”) updates the information on this website regularly. However, such information is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all matters and developments concerning Calibre and Calibre cannot guarantee the accuracy, currency or completeness of the information at all times and assumes no responsibility in this regard.

Darren Hall, Chief Operating Officer of Calibre, is the qualified person who has reviewed and approved of the scientific and technical information disclosed on this website.

This website and the materials posted on it do not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any securities of Calibre and any representation to the contrary would be unlawful.

CAUTION ON FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This website and the materials posted on it include certain “forward-looking information” and “forward-looking statements” (collectively “forward-looking statements”) within the meaning of applicable Canadian and United States securities legislation, including projections, estimates and other statements regarding future financial and operational performance, events, production, revenue, costs, capital expenditures, investments, budgets, ore grades, sources and types of ore, stripping ratios, throughput, cash flows, growth and acquisitions; production estimates and guidance, including the Company’s projected gold production in 2019; statements regarding anticipated exploration, development, production, permitting and other activities and achievements of the Company, including expected grades and sources of ore to be processed; the projections included in existing technical reports, economic assessments and feasibility studies; anticipated or potential new technical reports and studies; the expected mine life for La Libertad Mine; the adequacy of capital for continued operations, and statements regarding the Company’s corporate social responsibility policies or other internal policies. Estimates of mineral resources and reserves are also forward-looking statements because they constitute projections, based on certain estimates and assumptions, regarding the amount of minerals that may be encountered in the future and/or the anticipated economics of production, should a production decision be made. All statements found on this website and the materials posted on it that address events or developments that we expect to occur in the future are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts and are generally, although not always, identified by words such as “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “project”, “target”, “potential”, “schedule”, “forecast”, “budget”, “estimate”, “intend” or “believe” and similar expressions or their negative connotations, or that events or conditions “will”, “would”, “may”, “could”, “should” or “might” occur. All such forward-looking statements are based on the opinions and estimates of management as of the date such statements are made. 

Forward-looking statements necessarily involve assumptions, risks and uncertainties, certain of which are beyond Calibre’s control, including risks associated with the volatility of metal prices and our common shares; risks and dangers inherent in exploration, development and mining activities; uncertainty of reserve and resource estimates; risk of not achieving production, cost or other estimates; risk that actual production, development plans and costs differ materially from the estimates in our feasibility studies; risks related to hedging activities and ore purchase commitments; the ability to obtain and maintain any necessary permits, consents or authorizations required for mining activities; risks related to environmental regulations or hazards and compliance with complex regulations associated with mining activities; the ability to replace mineral reserves and identify acquisition opportunities; fluctuations in exchange rates; availability of financing and financing risks; risks related to operations in foreign countries and compliance with foreign laws; risks related to remote operations and the availability adequate infrastructure, fluctuations in price and availability of energy and other inputs necessary for mining operations; shortages or cost increases in necessary equipment, supplies and labour; regulatory, political and country risks; risks related to reliance upon contractors, third parties and joint venture partners; challenges to title or surface rights; dependence on key personnel and the ability to attract and retain skilled personnel; the risk of an uninsurable or uninsured loss; adverse climate and weather conditions; litigation risk; competition with other mining companies; changes in tax laws; community support for our operations including risks related to strikes and the halting of such operations from time to time; risks related to failures of information systems or information security threats; the ability to maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting as required by law; the ability to comply with the Company’s corporate social responsibility policies or other internal policies; as well as other factors identified and as described in more detail under the heading “Risk Factors” in Calibre’s most recent Management Discussion & Analysis and Calibre’s other filings with Canadian securities regulators which may be viewed at www.sedar.com . The list is not exhaustive of the factors that may affect the Company’s forward-looking statements. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate, and actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, these forward-looking statements. Accordingly, no assurance can be given that any events anticipated by the forward-looking statements will transpire or occur, or if any of them do, what benefits or liabilities Calibre will derive therefrom. The Company’s forward-looking statements reflect current expectations regarding future events and operating performance and speak only as of the date hereof and the Company does not assume any obligation to update forward-looking statements if circumstances or management’s beliefs, expectations or opinions should change other than as required by applicable law. For the reasons set forth above, undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING MINERAL RESERVE AND RESOURCE ESTIMATES

This website and the materials posted on it have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the securities laws in effect in Canada, which differ from the requirements of U.S. securities laws.  All resource and reserve estimates included on this website and the materials posted on it have been prepared in accordance with National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects (“NI 43-101”). NI 43-101 is a rule developed by the Canadian Securities Administrators that establishes standards for all public disclosure an issuer makes of scientific and technical information concerning mineral projects.  These standards differ significantly from the mineral reserve disclosure requirements of the SEC set out in Industry Guide 7. Consequently, reserve and resource information contained on this website and the materials posted on it are not comparable to similar information that would generally be disclosed by U.S. companies in accordance with SEC standards.

In particular, the SEC’s Industry Guide 7 applies different standards in order to classify mineralization as a reserve. As a result, the definitions of proven and probable reserves used in NI 43-101 differ from the definitions in SEC Industry Guide 7. Under SEC standards, mineralization may not be classified as a “reserve” unless the determination has been made that the mineralization could be economically and legally produced or extracted at the time the reserve determination is made.  Among other things, all necessary permits would be required to be in hand or issuance imminent in order to classify mineralized material as reserves under the SEC standards. Accordingly, mineral reserve estimates contained on this website and the materials posted on it may not qualify as “reserves” under SEC standards.

In addition, this website and the materials posted on it uses the terms “mineral resources”, “measured mineral resources”, “indicated mineral resources” and “inferred mineral resources” to comply with the reporting standards in Canada. The SEC’s Industry Guide 7 does not recognize these categories and U.S. companies are generally not permitted to disclose them in documents they file with the SEC. Investors are specifically cautioned not to assume that any part or all of any mineral deposits in these categories will ever be converted into mineral reserves under SEC standards. Further, “inferred mineral resources” have a great amount of uncertainty as to their existence and as to whether they can be mined legally or economically. Therefore, investors are also cautioned not to assume that all or any part of an inferred mineral resource exists. In accordance with Canadian rules, estimates of “inferred mineral resources” cannot form the basis of feasibility or, except in limited circumstances, other economic studies. It cannot be assumed that all or any part of “indicated mineral resources” or “inferred mineral resources” will ever be upgraded to a higher category of mineral resources or that mineral resources will be classified as mineral reserves. Investors are cautioned not to assume that any part of the reported “measured mineral resources”, “indicated mineral resources” or “inferred mineral resources” on this website and the materials posted on it are economically or legally mineable. Disclosure of “contained ounces” is permitted under the Canadian disclosure rules; however, the SEC normally only permits issuers to report mineralization that do not constitute reserves as in place tonnage and grade without reference to unit measures. Further, while NI 43-101 permits companies to disclose economic projections contained in preliminary economic assessments which are not based on “mineral reserves”, U.S. companies are not normally permitted to disclose economic projections for a mineral property in their SEC filings prior to the establishment of “mineral reserves.” For the above reasons, information contained on this website and the materials posted on it that describes the Company’s mineral reserve and resource estimates or that describes the results of pre-feasibility or other studies is not comparable to similar information made public by U.S. companies subject to the reporting and disclosure requirements of the SEC.

NON-IFRS MEASURES

The Company believes that investors use certain non-IFRS measures as indicators to assess gold mining companies, specifically Total Cash Costs per Ounce and All-In Sustaining Cash Costs per Ounce. In the gold mining industry, these are common performance measures but do not have any standardized meaning. The Company believes that, in addition to conventional measures prepared in accordance with IFRS, certain investors use this information to evaluate the Company’s performance and ability to generate cash flow. Accordingly, it is intended to provide additional information and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS.

(1) Total Cash Costs per Ounce of Gold: Total cash costs include mine site operating costs such as mining, processing and local administrative costs (including stock-based compensation related to mine operations), royalties, production taxes, mine standby costs and current inventory write downs, if any.  Production costs are exclusive of depreciation and depletion, reclamation, capital and exploration costs.  Total cash costs per gold ounce are net of by-product silver sales and are divided by gold ounces sold to arrive at a per ounce figure.

(2) All-In Sustaining Costs per Ounce of Gold:  A performance measure that reflects all of the expenditures that are required to produce an ounce of gold from current operations.  While there is no standardized meaning of the measure across the industry, the Company’s definition is derived from the AISC definition as set out by the World Gold Council in its guidance dated June 27, 2013 and November 16, 2018.  The World Gold Council is a non-regulatory, non-profit organization established in 1987 whose members include global senior mining companies. The Company believes that this measure will be useful to external users in assessing operating performance and the ability to generate free cash flow from current operations.  The Company defines AISC as the sum of total cash costs (per above), sustaining capital (capital required to maintain current operations at existing levels), capital lease repayments, corporate general and administrative expenses, in-mine exploration expenses and rehabilitation accretion and amortization related to current operations.  AISC excludes capital expenditures for significant improvements at existing operations deemed to be expansionary in nature, exploration and evaluation related to growth projects, rehabilitation accretion and amortization not related to current operations, financing costs, debt repayments, and taxes.  Total all-in sustaining costs are divided by gold ounces sold to arrive at a per ounce figure.


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